Zinc Anode

clock June 15, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

The in-line zinc anode is attached to the bonding wire, thereby protecting all metal parts (heaters, lights, rails, etc.) from galvanic corrosion. Zinc anodes will sacrifice themselves and corrode before all other metals in the pool. Zinc anodes need to be replaced approximately every 4-5 years on average.  Many factors can affect how quickly it will need to be replaced.  We have encountered some pools where the zinc anode had to be replaced every year.

Any time you have different metals (copper, stainless steel, etc.) in a salt water pool, you create a battery. Some amount of current flows between the metals. The electrons that make up the current are supplied by one of the metals, giving up bits of itself in the form of metal ions to the pool water. This is called galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion causes plaster discoloration and metal erosion. The best way to inhibit the effect of galvanic corrosion is to use a zinc anode. Zinc is a metal that gives up its metal ions faster than other metals in the pool. In other words, the zinc anode will erode instead of other metals (pool light, rails, heater, light niche, ladder, etc.). The zinc ions will not discolor the pool plaster. The zinc anode should be replaced after half of it has eroded.

Galvanic corrosion can also occur pools that do not use salt water. Any stray electrical current around the pool area can cause it. Also, many localities are now requiring that the pool water be bonded. The inline zinc anode also performs this function.

This article is courtesy of the Pool Tool Company (www.pooltool.com). Here is a link to their zinc anode brochure (http://pooltool.com/images/catalog/brochurePrint.zip )



Basic Pool Maintenance

clock May 26, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Pool maintenance relies on some basic steps that are simple, but effective. You should pay close attention to these steps to help keep your pool looking and performing at its best.

Circulation

The water in your pool must be circulating for the products to work properly. This makes it harder for bacteria and algae to grow. The more water that goes through the filter will make it work more efficiently and effectively. APSP standards call for your filter system to be able to turn your pool water over within 12 hours. It is recommended that your water be filtered for at least 10 hours or more at any given time, preferably, during the day. Some conditions may require you to run your pump longer.

Filtration

The filter is used to keep your water clear and it removes debris. To do this, it is recommended that (for sand and DE filters) the filter be backwashed when the pressure of the water in the filter gets above its normal pressure (see your manufacturer’s handbook). However, backwashing alone doesn’t remove oils or stains, nor can you backwash a cartridge filter. Every filter should be cleaned with a chemical filter cleaner as part of a maintenance program. See the instructions on the particular filter cleaner you are using for proper use. With proper cleaning and care, the sand in most sand filters should be changed every 3-5 years.

Cleaning

Leading pool chemical manufacturers recommend that your pool should be cleaned weekly. You can do this by using a manual vacuuming system or by adding an automatic pool cleaner.

Testing

Another way to keep your pool at its best is remembering to test the water. You should test your pool water at least once a week. The tests are for pH, active sanitizer (available chlorine, bromine, Baquacil, etc.), total alkalinity, calcium hardness, salt (when applicable), stabilizer (when applicable), etc. You can also periodically bring a water sample to your local pool store if they offer water analysis services (usually for a small fee to cover their expenses). They will be able to give you a computer printout of your results with recommendations for treatment. You should also bring in a water sample prior to closing your pool. These tips will help you keep a proper balance and also decrease the risks of any future problems.



Air Leaks

clock May 11, 2017 01:30 by author medallionpools |

Are you noticing bubbles now starting to blow into your pool through the return fitting? Have you noticed the strainer basket (housed in the pump area with a lid on top) is no longer filling up with water like it used to? Have you noticed your skimmer is making a sound like sipping on a Slurpee?

If so, these are all signs that you have a possible air leak or the water level in your pool is too low. With low water level, the skimmer will pull in water and air and cause a noise or air bubbles. Your pump may even lose its prime. Try to maintain your pool water level at least half way up your skimmer.

If the pool does have enough water, then you might be getting an air leak thru the lid on your pump’s strainer basket. That lid has an o-ring. That o-ring needs to be removed and cleaned. Move it all around checking for any cracks or breaks in the o-ring. Replace the o-ring if you find these cracks or tears. Remember every time you open the lid on the strainer basket to clean the basket, you are letting air into your system.

When you put the o-ring back in place, you should coat it with O-Ring Lube (not Vaseline or other petroleum based produces). Vaseline and other petroleum based lubricants will cause the o-ring to deteriorate and break down. You may have a filter with a multiport value. On the side of that value is a bleeder valve designed to release air. Open it slightly to see if you can remove the air and let the water fill up completely in the pump’s strainer basket. Most of the time the problem is low water level in the pool or a worn out o-ring on pump lid.

Other items to check that do not occur as often are; a cracked pump lid, a cracked pump housing, the seal around the pump’s drain plug, a leaking plumbing joint, a crack in the pipe, a crack in the skimmer, etc.



What To Do If Your Pool Motor Just Hums When You Turn It On

clock May 9, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

As you read this article, please bear in mind that this just a generic guide and not meant to be a complete set of instructions. You are dealing with an electric motor. Electricity is extremely dangerous. If you are uncertain about any of this, do not attempt to repair this on your own; contact a suitable service technician.

At some point over the life of your pool pump you may turn it on one day and all that happens is you hear is a humming sound. If this happens, quickly turn off the pump. There are several possible causes. The most common time for this to occur is after the pump has been sitting idle for a long period of time (such as over the winter). Scale or other corrosion can build up in certain parts of the motor and make it difficult to start. With the power turned off, examine the back of your pool pump’s motor. You will need to remove the cover and manually spin the motor shaft. If the shaft spins freely, replace the cover and try the motor again. If not, you will need to disassemble the pump to determine if anything is clogging or jamming the impeller.

If nothing is jamming the impeller and the shaft still will not turn, you will probably need to replace the motor. If the shaft spins freely by hand, but still only hums when you turn on the power, you will need to use a multi-meter to verify the pump is receiving the correct amount of electricity. (Remember, if you are not properly trained on how to safely perform any of these procedures, hire a service technician or an electrician.) If the shaft spins freely by hand, you have the proper amount of electricity, and the unit still only hums, you will probably need to replace the motor.

In many cases, simply spinning the shaft manually to break it free then turning the power back on will correct the problem.



Inground vs. Above Ground

clock March 2, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Now that you have made the decision to install a swimming pool, the next big question is, Above Ground Pool or Inground Pool. This decision should be based on how long are you going to live in your current home, do you have drain field or septic tank that might interfere with construction, do you want a pool with an 8’ deep end for diving and finally the economic decision.

The Above Ground Pool can be round, rectangle or oval. Sizes may range from 15’ x 48” round up to 15’x 30’x 52” ovals or 16’ x 32’ rectangles. You need to lay out sizes in your yard to get a better idea of what will fit and what it will look like in your yard. When this pool is installed above ground, look at the options you have for entry way into the pool. Some of these are ladders and steps. Decide if you want a deck around part or all of your above ground pool.

The inground pool can be manufactured in virtually any size or shape to meet your budget. If you want a pool with an 8’ deep end, the size must be at least 16’ wide and 32’ long. This size pool will offer diving but very little room for games. Please take a look at some of our other blog posts on inground pools for a more thorough discussion of pool depths and shapes.

If you are looking for a traditional inground pool but your budget is more in line with an above ground pool, ask your local Medallion swimming pool dealer about the St. Croix Freedom Series. This pool is an above ground pool that can also be installed inground.