Floating Chlorine Dispensers

clock February 14, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Are you using chlorine tablets (1” or 3”) or chlorine sticks in your pool? If you are what are you using to get this chlorine into your pool? You may be using a Floating Chlorine Dispenser or Chlorine Floater.

The Floater, as the word states, floats around your pool and tablets slowly dissolve. You do not have water passing thru it very fast to dissolve the tablets or sticks rapidly. This system may work perfectly well for many small pools, spas, or swim spas. However, once you start getting to mid to large size pools (and occasionally some smaller pools with heavy bather loads), your pool water could become cloudy, algae could grow and the liner could become very slick due to the chlorine being released too slowly. The warmer it gets, the more chlorine demand your pool needs and that demand will be hard to satisfy with a Floater.

If you are having problems maintaining your Chlorine residual with a floater and you want to continue using tablets then take a look at an automatic chlorinator. This unit can be plumbed into your return line which has water flowing through it going back into your pool. You can use either 1” or 3” tablets or chlorine sticks in the Chlorinator. The Chlorinator has a control value on it that can be adjusted. You can regulate the amount of chlorine getting into the pool.



Is It Time To Add A Gas Heater To Our Pool?

clock October 20, 2016 07:00 by author medallionpools |

The heaters on the market today are now fast, efficient, compact, quiet, safe and eco-friendly. Now you do not have to wait until the temperatures are in the 80’s to enjoy swimming. On most of the new gas heaters there are no pilot lights; just push button digital controls plus a user-friendly indicator light makes operation and monitoring so simple.

Gas heaters are available for Propane or Natural Gas. If you live in an area with natural gas, your house might have a gas meter already attached to the house. You should get a licensed plumber to check this meter to make sure it will handle the additional BTU’s of the gas heater. BTU options will vary from 200,000 up to 400,000.

The size BTU heater you will need can be determined by your local Medallion pool dealer but it will depend on how many gallons of water you have in the pool and if you are looking to keep the pool heated all the time or only on demand. If you are going to install a propane heater, the local pool dealer can install the heater but you will need a propane company to make the connection from the propane tank to the heater. If you do not have a propane tank, the gas company can have one installed.

Placement of your new heater is very important. Refer to the manufacturer’s manual for proper placement. Here are some examples; if the heater is going under a deck, you must have proper clearance from heater to deck. If the heater will be installed indoors, the gas fumes must be vented outside. The heater can’t be installed next to your heat pump. The proper placement information will be found in the heater manual.

A gas heater is a great way to extend your swimming season. Depending on where you live, the proper size heater can give you 60 more days plus of swimming time. Now is a good time to visit your local pool dealer to learn more about the different heater options. While you are there, be sure to ask about a solar cover to help your heater be more efficient.



Swimming Pool Filter Multi-Port Valves

clock July 13, 2016 11:00 by author medallionpools |

This is a valve that may be attached on the top or on the side of your sand or DE filter. Six main functions are controlled with this valve plus one winterizing function. Please keep in mind that this article is for general information purposes only. Be sure to read your filter’s manual and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

The main functions are:

1. Filter

2. Backwash

3. Rinse

4. Recirculate

5. Close

6. Waste

The normal operating mode will be in the filter position. Water from the pool is going thru the filter and being cleaned and returning to the pool. You can vacuum your pool in the filter position. The debris from the pool goes into the filter. When you complete the vacuum process, remove your cleaning equipment and turn the pump off. Place the multiport handle in the backwash position. Turn pump on. Water will go out the backwash hose and fill up the sight glass on side of the value. When it is clear, turn pump off and put valve in rinse function. Turn pump on for about 20 seconds. This clears debris from plumbing lines inside the filter.

If you have periods of heavy rain and notice the water level of your pool is getting very high, turn the pump off and place the multiport handle in the waste position. Turn pump on. This bypasses the filter and lets water go directly out the backwash hose. You can also vacuum your pool in this position if your pool has a lot of water or you have a lot of dirt in the bottom of the pool you don’t want to vacuum into your filter media. The recirculate function bypasses your filter and might be used when you use floc or alum in your pool (helps clean a cloudy pool).

Your pump has a strainer basket that needs to be checked weekly (at the minimum) to remove any leaves or debris. Depending you the conditions around you pool you may need to check it more often. When you open the lid to remove the basket, you are letting air in your plumbing lines. Place the multiport handle in the closed position first might help keep more water in your plumbing lines. Take it off of closed and go back to filter before you turn pump on.



Swimming Pool Equipment Maintenance Tips

clock June 29, 2016 09:30 by author medallionpools |

Here are just a couple of quick equipment maintenance tips to help keep things running smoothly. Be sure to read your equipment manuals and follow the manufacturers’ recommendations.

If you have a Sand or DE filter you probably have a Multi-Port Value that either attaches to the top of your filter or is mounted on the side of your filter. The handle you push down when you want to change a function has a spring under it which you can’t see. It is a good idea once or twice during the pool season, turn your pump off, push the handle down and spray some type of lubricant under the handle to keep the spring lubricated.

The pump has a lid that has an o-ring either that mounts on the lid or has a grove in the pump it mounts to. This o-ring needs to be lubricated with o-ring lube to help it seal better and make it easier for you to remove the pump lid to clean the strainer basket. If the o-ring does not seal properly, your pump may not prime or the strainer basket may not fill up completely with water. You will notice a lot of air bubbles.

On the pump you also have drain plugs. Most of these drain plugs have a small o-ring. If this o-ring is missing or broken, a lot of air will get into your filtration system and the pump may have a hard time priming or the strainer basket may not fill up with water. Make sure the o-ring is in place. You can wrap a small amount of Teflon tape around the threads and cover that with o-ring lube.

If you have an Automatic Chlorinator, this unit has an o-ring. This o-ring is either mounted in the top of the lid or on the chlorinator itself. This o-ring will wear out and become brittle and may have some small breaks in it. This could cause air leaks. Replace if needed and cover with o-ring lube.



Zinc Anode

clock June 14, 2016 07:00 by author medallionpools |

The in-line zinc anode is attached to the bonding wire, thereby protecting all metal parts (heaters, lights, rails, etc.) from galvanic corrosion. Zinc anodes will sacrifice themselves and corrode before all other metals in the pool. Zinc anodes need to be replaced approximately every 4-5 years on average.  Many factors can affect how quickly it will need to be replaced.  We have encountered some pools where the zinc anode had to be replaced every year.

Any time you have different metals (copper, stainless steel, etc.) in a salt water pool, you create a battery. Some amount of current flows between the metals. The electrons that make up the current are supplied by one of the metals, giving up bits of itself in the form of metal ions to the pool water. This is called galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion causes plaster discoloration and metal erosion. The best way to inhibit the effect of galvanic corrosion is to use a zinc anode. Zinc is a metal that gives up its metal ions faster than other metals in the pool. In other words, the zinc anode will erode instead of other metals (pool light, rails, heater, light niche, ladder, etc.). The zinc ions will not discolor the pool plaster. The zinc anode should be replaced after half of it has eroded.

Galvanic corrosion can also occur pools that do not use salt water. Any stray electrical current around the pool area can cause it. Also, many localities are now requiring that the pool water be bonded. The inline zinc anode also performs this function.

This article is courtesy of the Pool Tool Company (www.pooltool.com). Here is a link to their zinc anode brochure (http://pooltool.com/images/catalog/brochurePrint.zip )