Misconceptions About Swimming Pool Maintenance

clock June 21, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Many homeowners who have expressed an interest in installing a swimming pool may have been told by a friend or neighbor, that pool will work you to death. “You will never have time to enjoy your pool. My neighbor installed a swimming pool about 20 years ago and I see him at the pool every day either cleaning it or putting chemicals in it.”

These are all misconceptions that relate back to the time when most people used granular chlorine as their chemical of choice. This chemical had to go into the pool every day, approximately 1 pound per 10,000 gallons of pool water. This chemical will leave a lot of residue on the pool floor that will require vacuuming quite often. As you vacuum, this residue will turn cloudy and you will need another chemical to clear the pool.

With chemical technology today along with the many automatic pool cleaners available, your weekly maintenance time on your pool will be very short and in most cases, less than one hour. If you use for example, a chlorine generator (salt system) you will add the salt directly to the pool when the unit lets you know the salt level is getting low. This may be as little as two to three bags per season.

This type of system will not have the residue that the granular chlorine system will produce. Very little vacuuming will be required. Chlorine generators are just one example of a sanitizer system you could use. Our message is, if you have an interest in installing a swimming pool; meet with your local pool dealer to learn more about all the different types of sanitizers and cleaners that are available. A swimming pool now can be a lot of fun with very little maintenance.



Zinc Anode

clock June 15, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

The in-line zinc anode is attached to the bonding wire, thereby protecting all metal parts (heaters, lights, rails, etc.) from galvanic corrosion. Zinc anodes will sacrifice themselves and corrode before all other metals in the pool. Zinc anodes need to be replaced approximately every 4-5 years on average.  Many factors can affect how quickly it will need to be replaced.  We have encountered some pools where the zinc anode had to be replaced every year.

Any time you have different metals (copper, stainless steel, etc.) in a salt water pool, you create a battery. Some amount of current flows between the metals. The electrons that make up the current are supplied by one of the metals, giving up bits of itself in the form of metal ions to the pool water. This is called galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion causes plaster discoloration and metal erosion. The best way to inhibit the effect of galvanic corrosion is to use a zinc anode. Zinc is a metal that gives up its metal ions faster than other metals in the pool. In other words, the zinc anode will erode instead of other metals (pool light, rails, heater, light niche, ladder, etc.). The zinc ions will not discolor the pool plaster. The zinc anode should be replaced after half of it has eroded.

Galvanic corrosion can also occur pools that do not use salt water. Any stray electrical current around the pool area can cause it. Also, many localities are now requiring that the pool water be bonded. The inline zinc anode also performs this function.

This article is courtesy of the Pool Tool Company (www.pooltool.com). Here is a link to their zinc anode brochure (http://pooltool.com/images/catalog/brochurePrint.zip )



Easy Vacuuming On Battery Power

clock June 8, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Do you get out your telescopic pole, vacuum brush, vacuum hose,and skim vac to clean your pool weekly? Then you have to attach these items and prime the hose before you start to clean your pool. Then when you finish cleaning the pool, you have to turn the pump off, and now backwash your filter then put these items away.

This problem makes you tired just thinking about it. Now, put all those worries behind you. Options are now available that will make it a lot easier for you. Maybe you just have a small area in your pool you want to clean but hate the thought of having to get out all the equipment you would need to vacuum this one area.

Take a look at the battery powered cleaners. All you need is your telescopic pole and a little effort on your part. No hose to prime. No water loss from the pool since you will not have to backwash the filter. The cleaners will attach to the telescopic pole and then you start to vacuum. What you vacuum will go into the mesh net inside the unit. When you finish, just remove the mesh net and clean out the debris.

Just think, no more leaning over the pool to have to prime the hose and then having to install the hose into the skimmer. How many times have you lost your prime from the pump while trying to do this?



WHAT DOES THE pH READING MEAN IN A SWIMMING POOL

clock June 6, 2017 03:00 by author medallionpools |

PH is a term that is used to measure whether something is acidic (low pH) or basic (high pH). This reading is expressed in a scale in a range from 0-14. Swimming pool water should be maintained at a neutral pH of between 7.2-7.6. Maintaining the proper pH level helps maintain your pool equipment, allows the chemicals to be more effective and makes the water comfortable for swimming.

A low pH reading can cause skin and eye irritation, damage the liner, damage the surface of concrete pools, and corrode your pool’s equipment. A high pH reading could cause cloudy water, scale to form, and sanitizer to be less effective. Some of the common causes of pH changes are:

• Chemicals- Chlorine tablets or sticks lower pH. Granular chlorine raises pH.

• Adding fresh water to your pool will change the pH levels.

• Dust and rain will change the pH levels.

• Swimmers and swimmers waste will tend to lower the pH.

• Algae growth usually raises the pH level.

It is very important that you have a good test kit for testing pH and also take a sample of your pool water on a regular basis to your pool store so they can test the readings for you and tell you how to adjust the pH level.



Caring For Your Chlorine Generator (Salt System)

clock June 1, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

If you have a chlorine generator (salt system) you know how easy it is to use. By the time you are done reading this you will also know how easy it is to maintain. And all of you that don’t have one will probably being going out to get one after you see the ease of maintenance in taking care of them. Please remember that the following article is for general information purposes only. Refer to your owner’s manual for complete information for the proper maintenance and care of your particular chlorine generator.

Chlorine generators are units that take salt and convert it into liquid chlorine. There are several features that are wonderful about this unit.

Features:

-no chlorine smell

-better for your skin

-savings over the years because you are not buying chlorine tablets or granular chlorine anymore

-easy to install

-easy to use

-easy to take care of

-most have a built in timer so they run automatically

-plus many more options!

Let say your system is already installed. What do you do to maintain it? Most of the higher quality chlorine generators are self cleaning, however, I would recommend still cleaning them once a season to make sure it runs at peak efficiency. Throughout the season you should visit you local pool retailer and purchase a “cell cleaner”. This is a chemical that you can use to flush out the cell of the unit. By using this chemical it will rid your unit of unwanted debris such as calcium build up. Calcium build up is usually visible if you have it, is generally white in color and sticks to the inside of the cell. Some chemical companies have different recommendations so please read the back of the container you buy to see how yours is supposed to be used. The most common method is taking the cell off the pool and mixing the cell cleaner with water and putting it in the cell. You will need two caps to place on each end of the cell to keep the solution from coming out. Shake this up and let it sit for a few hours then rinse it out completely. This is a simple way to clean your unit and takes minimal time and easy to do.

When you winterize your pool you should always remove your cell. If left on the pool the cell could get moisture in it, freeze, and crack over the winter. Most manufacturers will not cover cells that have frozen and been damaged. Once you remove the cell from the pool the easiest thing to do is wrap up the ends of the exposed pipe with a plastic bag or plastic wrap and a rubber band, this will keep anything from getting in the pipes. Make sure the cell is completely dry and store inside for the winter. That’s it!! It’s that simple!

Now when summer comes around you take about 5 minutes putting the cell back on and your ready to go!