My Swimming Pool Never Gets A Chlorine Reading

clock May 31, 2016 10:30 by author medallionpools |

In order to answer why, these are some basic questions that must be answered.

1. If you have a sand filter, when was the last time you either cleaned or changed the sand?

2. If you use chlorine tablets, do you use the 3” or 1” size?

3. How many hours a day to run your pump?

4. What is the level of Stabilizer in your pool water?

If you have a sand filter, you should clean the sand at least once each season and change the sand about every three to five years as long as you are cleaning the sand each season. Oils from your body, sweat, suntan lotion all get inside your filter and make the sand less effective. You need a chemical to break up these containments and make your filter more effective.

With the use of chlorine tablets, if you use the 3” size, they may not be dissolving quickly enough to meet your pool’s chlorine demand. You may also have a very low stabilizer reading. Chlorine tablets have stabilizer built into them but they need to dissolve quickly enough in order for the stabilizer level in your pool to be above 40. If below that, the sun will take out the chlorine almost as soon as you get it into the pool.

In the very hot summer months, your pump needs to run 24 hrs a day 7 days a week. You can’t run the pump only at night or only during the day and keep the proper chlorine level in your pool. You will spend more money on chemicals to control algae and acid levels than you will with energy. A good test kit is a must. Try the five way test strips.Please keep in mind that this is just a generic overview of a few of the main causes of low chlorine problems. Before adding any chemicals to your pool be sure to have your water properly tested then read and follow the instructions printed on the labels. Always remember “Safety First” when dealing with chemicals.



Water Returns Slowly To My Pool

clock May 24, 2016 07:00 by author medallionpools |

A swimming pool has a skimmer where the pool water goes into and from there into the filter and then back to the pool thru the return wall fitting. Have you noticed your return water flow is not as strong as it used to be? What could be causing this?

If you have a Cartridge Filter, when was the last time you changed or cleaned your filter? If you have a DE Filter, have you checked the grids inside lately? If you have a Sand Filter, when was the last time you changed or cleaned your sand? If you have maintained your filter properly, then this might not be your problem.

When you vacuum your pool, do you use a Skimvac that fits over top of your skimmer basket? By using this Skimvac, the basket can stay in place and trap any leaves or debris. If you do not use the Skimvac, you may have some debris trapped in the impeller of the motor in your swimming pool pump. This impeller has to rotate so many revelations per minute. Leaves and debris will slow this movement.

Slow water flow does not mean your swimming pool pump is going bad. You need to check the impeller, the skimmer and strainer baskets and even your plumbing lines. When the water flow slows down, the filter and these other items need to be checked. Something is restricting the flow of water back to the pool. In most cases, this is simply an issue with a dirty filter or baskets, so check those first.



Air Leaks

clock April 14, 2016 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Are you noticing bubbles now starting to blow into your pool through the return fitting? Have you noticed the strainer basket (housed in the pump area with a lid on top) is no longer filling up with water like it used to? Have you noticed your skimmer is making a sound like sipping on a Slurpee?

If so, these are all signs that you have a possible air leak or the water level in your pool is too low. With low water level, the skimmer will pull in water and air and cause a noise or air bubbles. Your pump may even lose its prime. Try to maintain your pool water level at least half way up your skimmer.

If the pool does have enough water, then you might be getting an air leak thru the lid on your pump’s strainer basket. That lid has an o-ring. That o-ring needs to be removed and cleaned. Move it all around checking for any cracks or breaks in the o-ring. Replace the o-ring if you find these cracks or tears. Remember every time you open the lid on the strainer basket to clean the basket, you are letting air into your system.

When you put the o-ring back in place, you should coat it with O-Ring Lube (not Vaseline or other petroleum based produces). Vaseline and other petroleum based lubricants will cause the o-ring to deteriorate and break down. You may have a filter with a multiport value. On the side of that value is a bleeder valve designed to release air. Open it slightly to see if you can remove the air and let the water fill up completely in the pump’s strainer basket. Most of the time the problem is low water level in the pool or a worn out o-ring on pump lid.

Other items to check that do not occur as often are; a cracked pump lid, a cracked pump housing, the seal around the pump’s drain plug, a leaking plumbing joint, a crack in the pipe, a crack in the skimmer, etc.



What To Do If Your Pool Motor Just Hums When You Turn It On

clock April 12, 2016 08:30 by author medallionpools |

As you read this article, please bear in mind that this just a generic guide and not meant to be a complete set of instructions. You are dealing with an electric motor. Electricity is extremely dangerous. If you are uncertain about any of this, do not attempt to repair this on your own; contact a suitable service technician.

At some point over the life of your pool pump you may turn it on one day and all that happens is you hear is a humming sound. If this happens, quickly turn off the pump. There are several possible causes. The most common time for this to occur is after the pump has been sitting idle for a long period of time (such as over the winter). Scale or other corrosion can build up in certain parts of the motor and make it difficult to start. With the power turned off, examine the back of your pool pump’s motor. You will need to remove the cover and manually spin the motor shaft. If the shaft spins freely, replace the cover and try the motor again. If not, you will need to disassemble the pump to determine if anything is clogging or jamming the impeller.

If nothing is jamming the impeller and the shaft still will not turn, you will probably need to replace the motor. If the shaft spins freely by hand, but still only hums when you turn on the power, you will need to use a multi-meter to verify the pump is receiving the correct amount of electricity. (Remember, if you are not properly trained on how to safely perform any of these procedures, hire a service technician or an electrician.) If the shaft spins freely by hand, you have the proper amount of electricity, and the unit still only hums, you will probably need to replace the motor.

In many cases, simply spinning the shaft manually to break it free then turning the power back on will correct the problem.