WHAT DOES THE pH READING MEAN IN A SWIMMING POOL

clock June 6, 2017 03:00 by author medallionpools |

PH is a term that is used to measure whether something is acidic (low pH) or basic (high pH). This reading is expressed in a scale in a range from 0-14. Swimming pool water should be maintained at a neutral pH of between 7.2-7.6. Maintaining the proper pH level helps maintain your pool equipment, allows the chemicals to be more effective and makes the water comfortable for swimming.

A low pH reading can cause skin and eye irritation, damage the liner, damage the surface of concrete pools, and corrode your pool’s equipment. A high pH reading could cause cloudy water, scale to form, and sanitizer to be less effective. Some of the common causes of pH changes are:

• Chemicals- Chlorine tablets or sticks lower pH. Granular chlorine raises pH.

• Adding fresh water to your pool will change the pH levels.

• Dust and rain will change the pH levels.

• Swimmers and swimmers waste will tend to lower the pH.

• Algae growth usually raises the pH level.

It is very important that you have a good test kit for testing pH and also take a sample of your pool water on a regular basis to your pool store so they can test the readings for you and tell you how to adjust the pH level.



Caring For Your Chlorine Generator (Salt System)

clock June 1, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

If you have a chlorine generator (salt system) you know how easy it is to use. By the time you are done reading this you will also know how easy it is to maintain. And all of you that don’t have one will probably being going out to get one after you see the ease of maintenance in taking care of them. Please remember that the following article is for general information purposes only. Refer to your owner’s manual for complete information for the proper maintenance and care of your particular chlorine generator.

Chlorine generators are units that take salt and convert it into liquid chlorine. There are several features that are wonderful about this unit.

Features:

-no chlorine smell

-better for your skin

-savings over the years because you are not buying chlorine tablets or granular chlorine anymore

-easy to install

-easy to use

-easy to take care of

-most have a built in timer so they run automatically

-plus many more options!

Let say your system is already installed. What do you do to maintain it? Most of the higher quality chlorine generators are self cleaning, however, I would recommend still cleaning them once a season to make sure it runs at peak efficiency. Throughout the season you should visit you local pool retailer and purchase a “cell cleaner”. This is a chemical that you can use to flush out the cell of the unit. By using this chemical it will rid your unit of unwanted debris such as calcium build up. Calcium build up is usually visible if you have it, is generally white in color and sticks to the inside of the cell. Some chemical companies have different recommendations so please read the back of the container you buy to see how yours is supposed to be used. The most common method is taking the cell off the pool and mixing the cell cleaner with water and putting it in the cell. You will need two caps to place on each end of the cell to keep the solution from coming out. Shake this up and let it sit for a few hours then rinse it out completely. This is a simple way to clean your unit and takes minimal time and easy to do.

When you winterize your pool you should always remove your cell. If left on the pool the cell could get moisture in it, freeze, and crack over the winter. Most manufacturers will not cover cells that have frozen and been damaged. Once you remove the cell from the pool the easiest thing to do is wrap up the ends of the exposed pipe with a plastic bag or plastic wrap and a rubber band, this will keep anything from getting in the pipes. Make sure the cell is completely dry and store inside for the winter. That’s it!! It’s that simple!

Now when summer comes around you take about 5 minutes putting the cell back on and your ready to go!



What Is Calcium Hardness And How Does It Affect A Pool Or Spa?

clock May 30, 2017 10:00 by author medallionpools |

GLB Calcium Hardness Up

Calcium Hardness is the measure of how much Calcium is dissolved in the pool water. You do not want your Calcium Hardness to be to high or to low, that is why we suggest that your Calcium Hardness needs to be between 150 and 250 ppm (Parts per million). The ideal range is not always ideal for everyone it could change on the type of pool you have, or the type of chemicals that you are using in your system please consult a pool professional. If your Calcium Hardness is too high or to low you may experience some problems with your pool. You may see some corrosion or some pitting of some areas.

When your Calcium Hardness is to low your water becomes corrosive. When your water is corrosive it can very easily stain the floor and the sides of your pool. Not to mention the damage it can do to the metal parts of your pool, corrode plumbing fittings, do damage to the pump and heater. This can cause pitting on your pool decking surfaces and on the pool concrete. It may also etch your pools plaster and destroy grout if these were used in the making and installing of your pool.

When your Calcium Hardness is too high you could very easily clog your pools filter and it may also clog your pools heater elements. This will also cause scale build up on all of the pools surfaces. The water will become cloudy and the higher the Calcium Hardness is then more irritation will be cause to the swimmers skin and eyes. So this is something you defiantly want to keep in between the correct range because having high or low Calcium Hardness can both affect your pool in the incorrect way.



Basic Pool Maintenance

clock May 26, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Pool maintenance relies on some basic steps that are simple, but effective. You should pay close attention to these steps to help keep your pool looking and performing at its best.

Circulation

The water in your pool must be circulating for the products to work properly. This makes it harder for bacteria and algae to grow. The more water that goes through the filter will make it work more efficiently and effectively. APSP standards call for your filter system to be able to turn your pool water over within 12 hours. It is recommended that your water be filtered for at least 10 hours or more at any given time, preferably, during the day. Some conditions may require you to run your pump longer.

Filtration

The filter is used to keep your water clear and it removes debris. To do this, it is recommended that (for sand and DE filters) the filter be backwashed when the pressure of the water in the filter gets above its normal pressure (see your manufacturer’s handbook). However, backwashing alone doesn’t remove oils or stains, nor can you backwash a cartridge filter. Every filter should be cleaned with a chemical filter cleaner as part of a maintenance program. See the instructions on the particular filter cleaner you are using for proper use. With proper cleaning and care, the sand in most sand filters should be changed every 3-5 years.

Cleaning

Leading pool chemical manufacturers recommend that your pool should be cleaned weekly. You can do this by using a manual vacuuming system or by adding an automatic pool cleaner.

Testing

Another way to keep your pool at its best is remembering to test the water. You should test your pool water at least once a week. The tests are for pH, active sanitizer (available chlorine, bromine, Baquacil, etc.), total alkalinity, calcium hardness, salt (when applicable), stabilizer (when applicable), etc. You can also periodically bring a water sample to your local pool store if they offer water analysis services (usually for a small fee to cover their expenses). They will be able to give you a computer printout of your results with recommendations for treatment. You should also bring in a water sample prior to closing your pool. These tips will help you keep a proper balance and also decrease the risks of any future problems.



Cleaning Debris From Your Pool After Opening It

clock May 24, 2017 08:30 by author medallionpools |

When spring comes and you are excited about opening your pool you also dread what could possibly be under the cover.

If you have a safety cover on your pool you are pretty sure there isn’t much under the cover but water.

With regular winter covers so many times leaves and small debris will get under the cover. Or if you are not careful debris will spill into the pool when the cover is removed. There are several ways to remove the leaves and small debris items. If there’s not much at the bottom then the easiest way is to use your telescopic pool and a leaf net. For more debris you can use a deep leaf net which can pick up quite a large amount. It could be a little hard on the arms and back pulling it out of the water but you will get much more in one scoop.

The best way is to use the Leaf Bagger. It is round and has a ring brush on the bottom with a mesh bag at the top. You attach a garden hose to it along with your telescopic pole and move it along the bottom of the pool. All the debris is collected into the mesh bag. You simply bring it up when it is full and empty it. This really saves a lot of time and the debris does not go into your filter so you don’t have to worry about backwashing your filter when you finish.