My Swimming Pool Is My Backyard Escape

clock May 18, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

Wake up early, make breakfast, fix lunch for your kids, either take them to school or get them on the school bus. Go home and get dressed and go to work. Work 8-10 hours. Come home, cook supper, help with homework, put kids to bed, fall out in your own bed. How many live this life style?

This pattern goes on every morning. Our lives are too short. We need some form of recreation and family togetherness. Loading up the car and going to the beach or local community swimming pool is starting to cost more and more money. Then you have to fight the crowds and the traffic driving home.

Think how great it would be to take that recreation time in your own backyard. No driving. No traffic. No having to stop to feed the kids or take them to the bathroom. Your own swimming pool is a means of a better lifestyle and well being for you and your family.

Swimming is great for your health and gets your kids out of the house for more exercise. With all the technology available today, kids have forgotten how to have fun without a computer. Do not look at a pool as a waste of money but as a means to improve your health and your family lifestyle. Cook your dinner outside by your pool. Eat by your pool. Enjoy your pool. No better time than now to take a visit to your local pool dealer.



Automatic Chlorinators

clock May 16, 2017 08:30 by author medallionpools |

The automatic chlorinator is a very efficient way to chlorinate your pool with large or small Trichlor tablets or Bromine slow-dissolving tablets to make sanitizing your pool or spa easy and automatic. If you do not have this unit, your options are;

1. Put the tablets in a floater

2. Put the tablets in the skimmer basket

3. Put the tablets in the pump basket

Any one of these three options will present you with a problem. The use of a floater is the lack of the ability to get the proper amount of chlorine in your pool. Since you do not have water flowing into the floater to dissolve the tablets, your pool water is going to be usually low in chlorine with the result being green water and algae build up.

When you place the tablets into your skimmer basket, they dissolve very quickly and it becomes very difficult to maintain the proper amount of chlorine in the pool. It can also deteriorate your skimmer basket and the seals and o-rings on your pump and filter. If you turn the pump off, chlorine will flow back into your pool causing a white stain in front of your skimmer.

If you place the tablets into your pump basket, they are also dissolving very quickly here and chlorine levels could be too high. This also will cause your pump seal to start leaking and your o-rings to wear out quickly with possible pump damage.

The automatic chlorinator is installed after the filter in the water return line going to the pool. It should be the last thing the water goes through before returning to your pool. These units are completely enclosed systems – no escaping fumes. Simple, trouble-free designs with no special venting required. Top loading makes it easy to add chemicals. You remove the lid and place the tablets inside. There is a control knob with different settings that will let you control the amount of chlorine being released into your pool. Note that every pool is different and you will need to adjust the settings based on your particular pool. Automatic chlorinators save time, reduce manual handling of chemicals and take the work and worry out of keeping your pool sparkling clean and ready to use.



Air Leaks

clock May 11, 2017 01:30 by author medallionpools |

Are you noticing bubbles now starting to blow into your pool through the return fitting? Have you noticed the strainer basket (housed in the pump area with a lid on top) is no longer filling up with water like it used to? Have you noticed your skimmer is making a sound like sipping on a Slurpee?

If so, these are all signs that you have a possible air leak or the water level in your pool is too low. With low water level, the skimmer will pull in water and air and cause a noise or air bubbles. Your pump may even lose its prime. Try to maintain your pool water level at least half way up your skimmer.

If the pool does have enough water, then you might be getting an air leak thru the lid on your pump’s strainer basket. That lid has an o-ring. That o-ring needs to be removed and cleaned. Move it all around checking for any cracks or breaks in the o-ring. Replace the o-ring if you find these cracks or tears. Remember every time you open the lid on the strainer basket to clean the basket, you are letting air into your system.

When you put the o-ring back in place, you should coat it with O-Ring Lube (not Vaseline or other petroleum based produces). Vaseline and other petroleum based lubricants will cause the o-ring to deteriorate and break down. You may have a filter with a multiport value. On the side of that value is a bleeder valve designed to release air. Open it slightly to see if you can remove the air and let the water fill up completely in the pump’s strainer basket. Most of the time the problem is low water level in the pool or a worn out o-ring on pump lid.

Other items to check that do not occur as often are; a cracked pump lid, a cracked pump housing, the seal around the pump’s drain plug, a leaking plumbing joint, a crack in the pipe, a crack in the skimmer, etc.



What To Do If Your Pool Motor Just Hums When You Turn It On

clock May 9, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

As you read this article, please bear in mind that this just a generic guide and not meant to be a complete set of instructions. You are dealing with an electric motor. Electricity is extremely dangerous. If you are uncertain about any of this, do not attempt to repair this on your own; contact a suitable service technician.

At some point over the life of your pool pump you may turn it on one day and all that happens is you hear is a humming sound. If this happens, quickly turn off the pump. There are several possible causes. The most common time for this to occur is after the pump has been sitting idle for a long period of time (such as over the winter). Scale or other corrosion can build up in certain parts of the motor and make it difficult to start. With the power turned off, examine the back of your pool pump’s motor. You will need to remove the cover and manually spin the motor shaft. If the shaft spins freely, replace the cover and try the motor again. If not, you will need to disassemble the pump to determine if anything is clogging or jamming the impeller.

If nothing is jamming the impeller and the shaft still will not turn, you will probably need to replace the motor. If the shaft spins freely by hand, but still only hums when you turn on the power, you will need to use a multi-meter to verify the pump is receiving the correct amount of electricity. (Remember, if you are not properly trained on how to safely perform any of these procedures, hire a service technician or an electrician.) If the shaft spins freely by hand, you have the proper amount of electricity, and the unit still only hums, you will probably need to replace the motor.

In many cases, simply spinning the shaft manually to break it free then turning the power back on will correct the problem.



How To Change The Sand In Your Pool Filter

clock May 4, 2017 07:00 by author medallionpools |

After a few years of normal operation your pool filter sand gets full of particles and debris that will cause your chemicals to not work as well as they normally should. Changing your sand is a simple process that should be done at least every 3-5 years to make sure your pool operates at 100%. Here are the quick and easy steps to replacing your sand filter. Please note that these are generic directions for a unit with a removable, top mount valve. For the correct procedure for your filter, refer to the owners manual that came with your filter.

1. Turn off the pump, unscrew the drain plug on the bottom of the sand tank, and take off the Multi-Port valve.

2. Take a wet/dry shop vacuum and suck out all the old water and sand.

3. Once all the sand is removed take a water hose and spray out any remaining debris that is left in the tank (Be cautious to not break the plastic laterals that are in the bottom of your tank when vacuuming)

4. Put back on the drain cap for the sand filter.

5. Fill your tank at least half way up with water (this helps the sand settle down easily without breaking the plastic laterals)

6. The type of sand that you add to the filter will be #20 silica sand which is specifically produced for filter media. This sand is between 40-50mm in diameter and is available from most swimming pool supply stores. Do not substitute other types of sand or you will almost certainly have problems with your filter and potentially damage the pool also.

7. The amount of sand that you add to the filter will depend on the size of filter that you have. You must be certain to find accurate information about how much sand to use in your filter. Over filling or underselling the filter will at least cause the filter to not function properly, and at worst cause damage to the filter. Filter sand sizes range typically from 100 or 150 lbs all the way up to 600lbs or more for large pools.

8. Be sure not to get any sand into the sandpipe which will be wide open. It is difficult to get the sand actually into the filter without getting it in the sandpipe so you may like to tape up the standpipe opening to prevent this spilled sand from making it back to the pool through the return lines. Also, be sure that the sandpipe is aligned in the center of the tank during the process of adding the sand. Failure to do so will cause you to have problems putting the multi-port valve back on the tank.

9. Gently pour the sand into the filter. Failure to fill the tank at lease half full of water and/or dumping the sand in too roughly can break the laterals in the bottom of the tank.

10. Once the sand tank is filled with the required amount of sand, you can put the MPV back on. Make sure the MPV is tight and secure (do not over tighten.)

11. Once back together the first thing you need to do is give the filter a thorough backwash. You should start this process by over filling the pool and then backwashing for as much as 3 to 5 minutes, followed by a 60 second rinse cycle before setting to "filter".

If you have any questions about the process of changing your sand, please make sure to contact your pool professional.